Live-Chat with SvelteKit and SocketIO

Live-Chat with SvelteKit and SocketIO

Add Socket.IO to your SvelteKit project and use the full power of realtime communication

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Linus Benkner
ยทFeb 6, 2022ยท

4 min read

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Table of contents

  • Setup the project
  • Install the dependencies
  • Inject the Socket.IO server
  • Server-side part
  • Client-Side part

Hi! ๐Ÿ‘‹

Today we're taking a look at Socket.IO and how we can integrate it into our SvelteKit project. As an example, we'll be building a realtime chat app in this demo.

Setup the project

First, we need a SvelteKit project. If you already have a project, you can skip this step. If not, you can simply create one with the following commands:

npm init svelte@next live-chat-app
cd live-chat-app
npm install
npm run dev -- --open

I'm using Tailwind CSS in this demo. I've already written an article on how to add Tailwind CSS to SvelteKit.

Install the dependencies

All we need is Socket.IO for the server-side part (handling the incoming requests and connections) and the Socket.IO-Client for the client-side part (sending and receiving messages).

npm i socket.io socket.io-client

Inject the Socket.IO server

We can inject the Socket.IO server directly in the SvelteKit config:

// ... (other imports here)
import { Server } from 'socket.io'; // <-- Import the Socket.IO server

const config = {
    // ...

    kit: {
        adapter: adapter(),
        vite: {
            plugins: [
                {
                    name: 'sveltekit-socket-io',
                    configureServer(server) {
                        const io = new Server(server.httpServer);

                        // Socket.IO stuff goes here                

                        console.log('SocketIO injected');
                    }
                }
            ]
        }
    },

    // ...
};

export default config;

Server-side part

For this demo, I'll keep things simple and generate a random username for each client and just broadcast incoming messages along with the username and time.

// This is located in the svelte config (see above "Socket.IO stuff goes here")
io.on('connection', (socket) => {
    // Generate a random username and send it to the client to display it
    let username = `User ${Math.round(Math.random() * 999999)}`;
    socket.emit('name', username);

    // Receive incoming messages and broadcast them
    socket.on('message', (message) => {
        io.emit('message', {
            from: username,
            message: message,
            time: new Date().toLocaleString()
        });
    });
});

Please note: This guide is not a full Socket.IO guide. The example is pretty simple and only to show you how to use Socket.IO with SvelteKit.

Client-Side part

Connect to Socket.IO

Because you may want to use the Socket.IO connection in multiple components or pages, I recommend to separate the connection stuff:

// src/lib/realtime.js
import ioClient from "socket.io-client";
const ENDPOINT = "http://localhost:3000";

const socket = ioClient(ENDPOINT)

export const io = socket

Now we can import and use io everywhere in our project.

Layout

Before we add Socket.IO to the client-side, I'll create a simple UI for our demo. Because this is only the chat, I'll do this directly in the src/routes/index.svelte:

<script>
    import { onMount } from "svelte";

    let textfield = ""
    let username = ""

    let messages = []

    function sendMessage() {

    }
</script>

<div class="h-screen w-screen bg-zinc-800">
    <div class="h-full w-full max-w-md mx-auto bg-zinc-500 flex flex-col">

        <header class="px-6 py-4 border-b border-zinc-800 bg-zinc-700 text-white shrink-0 flex items-center justify-between">
            <span class="font-bold text-xl">My Chat app</span>
            <span>{username}</span>
        </header>

        <div class="h-full w-full p-4">
            {#each messages as message}
                <div class="bg-zinc-300 rounded-xl rounded-tl-none px-4 py-3 my-4 w-fit">
                    <span class="flex items-center space-between gap-4">
                        <b>{message.from}</b>
                        <i>{message.time}</i>
                    </span>
                    {message.message}
                </div>
            {/each}
        </div>

        <form action="#" on:submit|preventDefault={sendMessage}
            class="px-6 py-4 border-t border-zinc-800 bg-zinc-700 text-white shrink-0 flex items-center"
        >
            <input type="text" bind:value={textfield} placeholder="Type something..." class="bg-transparent border-none px-4 py-3 w-full" />
            <button type="submit" class="shrink-0 border border-white rounded-lg px-4 py-3">Send</button>
        </form>

    </div>
</div>

As you can see, I'm storing all messages inside the messages array and output them inside the each loop.

To send messages, I've attached a listener to the form sendMessage.

Send messages

First, we need to import io from the file we just created (realtime.js). In our send function, we can simply trigger the message event (that's how we called it in the server-side part) with the message:

<script lang="ts">
    import { io } from "$lib/realtime";
    import { onMount } from "svelte";

    let textfield = ""
    let username = ""

    let messages = []

    function sendMessage() {
        const message = textfield.trim()
        if(!message) return

        textfield = ""
        io.emit("message", message) // Send the message
    }
</script>

Receive messages

To receive messages, we need to listen to the message event (that's how we called it in the server-side part). The object we receive is the same object we sent (server-side) and we can just add it to the messages array:

<script lang="ts">
    import { io } from "$lib/realtime";
    import { onMount } from "svelte";

    let textfield = ""
    let username = ""

    let messages = []

    onMount(() => {
        io.on("message", message => { // Listen to the message event
            messages = [...messages, message]
        })
        io.on("name", name => { // Another listener for the name:
            username = name // Update the name so it can be displayed
        })
    })

    function sendMessage() {
        const message = textfield.trim()
        if(!message) return

        textfield = ""
        io.emit("message", message) // Send the message
    }
</script>

Now, run npm run dev and test it out:

image.png


And that's it - now you can send data in realtime between the server and the client! ๐Ÿš€

Thanks for reading and have a great day ๐Ÿค—

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